Vanderbilt University Medical Center

D-7235 MCN, 1161 21st Avenue South
Nashville
TN
37232-2581
USA
Phone: (615) 343-6738
Fax: (615) 936-7800
DIVISION LEADERSHIP:
TRAINING PROGRAM CO-DIRECTOR: C. Buddy Creech, MD, MPH
RESEARCH INTEREST: Pathogenesis of S. aureus infections

TRAINING PROGRAM CO-DIRECTOR: Natasha B. Halasa, MD, MPH
RESEARCH INTEREST: Epidemiology of viral respiratory diseases in infants, young children, and the immunocompromised; global health
DIVISION CHIEF: Terence S. Dermody, MD
RESEARCH INTEREST: Pathogenesis of reovirus infections; vaccine development

CLINICAL SERVICES DIRECTOR: Kathryn Edwards, MD
RESEARCH INTERESTS: Evaluation of new vaccines for prevention of infectious diseases in adults and children; epidemiology of infections in children
FACULTY MEMBERS

PROFESSOR: Mark R Denison, MD
RESEARCH INTEREST: Replication of coronaviruses, emphasizing viral protein expression and processing

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: Fernando Polack, MD
RESEARCH INTEREST: RSV and influenza pathogenesis; epidemiology of viral respiratory disease

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Gregory J Wilson, MD
RESEARCH INTEREST: Mechanisms of reovirus entry into cells; mother-infant and pediatric HIV trials (PACTU)

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: John V Williams, MD
RESEARCH INTEREST: Immune response to human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus; clinical epidemiology of human metapneumovirus

INSTRUCTOR: Mark Hicar, MD, PhD
RESEARCH INTEREST: HIV antibody structure and function

MAJOR FEATURES OF TRAINING PROGRAM: The Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases at Vanderbilt Children’s Hospital in Nashville, Tennessee offers a comprehensive fellowship training program in pediatric infectious diseases. The primary focus of this training program is to develop physician-scientists for investigative careers in the field. A wide variety of research opportunities exist within the division and within the broader Vanderbilt research community. Each fellow’s research training is individualized, with opportunities to excel in either basic or clinical infectious diseases research. Strengths of the program include active, NIH-funded research programs in viral pathogenesis, vaccine development and testing, neonatal immune responses to infectious pathogens, clinical trials, pathogenesis of respiratory virus infections, HIV molecular virology, investigation of potential agents of bioterrorism, as well as other programs. A new program in pediatric hospital-based epidemiology is now in place. The Division encourages applications from individuals who desire solid fundamental training in clinical pediatric infectious diseases accompanied by intensive research training in preparation for a career as an academic investigator.

AFFILIATED HOSPITALS: Vanderbilt Childrens Hospital

The Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt opened its doors in 2004 and consists of eight floors and 616,785 square feet. The 11-story Doctors' Office Tower (DOT) attached to Children's Hospital is home to the pediatric clinics. In fiscal year 2007 (July 2006-June 2007), there were 226,467 pediatric visits at Children's Hospital. More than 154,393 children were seen in Children's clinics. The Emergency Department saw 43,908 children. There were a total of 12,914 admissions at Children's Hospital in 2007.
Inpatient Beds 222, Intensive Care 36, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit 78, Emergency Department 25 (plus 3 triage and 10 observation), Operating Rooms 16.

FELLOWS ACCEPTED EACH YEAR:
Two

TRAINING FOR MD; DO; MD, PhD:
Yes

FUNDING IS ENSURED FOR ALL 3 YEARS:
Yes

VISAS ACCEPTED:
J1, H1B, Other

IS COMPLETION OF PEDIATRIC RESIDENCY TRAINING IN THE U.S. OR CANADA A REQUIREMENT? YES/NO


THE PROGRAM OFFERS THE FOLLOWING TRAINING:


Program provides training in diagnostic microbiology using laboratories on site:


Microbiology laboratory: YES
Clinical virus isolation laboratory: YES
Molecular diagnostics: YES

Program provides training in infection control and hospital epidemiology as:


Didactic lectures: YES
Hands on experience: NO
Infection Control Meetings/Membership: YES


Opportunity to fulfill the ABP requirements for scholarly activity is available in the following general areas:


Bacteriology/bacterial infections: YES
Epidemiology and statistics:
YES
Infection control/hospital epidemiology: YES
Immunizations/Public health: YES
Mycology/fungal infections: NO
Parasitology/parasitic diseases: YES/Malaria
Virology/viral diseases: YES
Antimicrobial agents: YES


Research opportunities in the section’s program could be describes as:


This division has one of the broadest reaearch portfolios of any in the country.

Basic (bench): YES
Molecular: YES
Translational: YES
Epidemiologic: YES
Clinical: YES
International/Public Health: YES
Health Services: YES
HIV, Basic: YES
HIV, Clinical: YES
ACTG Site: YES
Other – Please specify:
Computational

Documented liaison exists offering opportunities for research experience n the laboratory of investigator(s) who is (are) not faculty of the section: YES


Program offers the opportunity to obtain a Master’s degree in a field such as Public Health, Education, Clinical Sciences, or Epidemiology (assuming appropriate arrangements are made): YES, MPH or MSCI
Other – Please specify:


Graduate school courses are available to trainee (assuming appropriate arrangements are made): YES

Program provides substantial clinical experiences for trainees in special areas/hosts:


HIV: YES
Bone marrow transplantation: YES
Solid organ/transplantation: YES
Travelers/adoptees: YES
Adults: YES
Congenital immune deficiencies: YES


Program includes ABP-required core curricula in scholarly activities in didactic lecture course for fellows (includes epidemiology, statistics, research design, and academic careers): YES


Program has an NIH-sponsored training grant: YES


The Infectious Diseases Service is the primary care provider for HIV-infected children and adolescents: YES


Average number of new outpatient consultations per month: 30

Average number of established outpatient follow-up visits per month:
50

Average number of new inpatient consultations per month:
70

Number of trainees completing program in the last 5 years: (2002-2007)
Five

TITLES OF RECENT FELLOW'S PUBLISHED PAPERS OR RESEARCH PROJECTS: Creech CB, Kernodle DS, Alsentzer A, Wilson C, and Edwards KM (2005). Increasing rates of nasal carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in healthy children. Pediatr Infect Dis J 24(7):617-21. Williams JV, Harris PA, Tollefson SJ, Halburnt-Rush LL, Pingsterhaus JM, Edwards KM, Wright PF, Crowe JE Jr. Human metapneumovirus and lower respiratory tract disease in otherwise healthy infants and children. N Engl J Med. 2004 Jan 29;350(5):443-50. Halasa NB , Griffin MR, Zhu Y,, and Edwards KM (2004). Differences in antibiotic prescribing patterns for children younger than five years in three major outpatient settings. J Pediatr 144(2):200-5. Wright PF, Mestecky J, McElrath MJ, Keefer MC, Gorse GJ, Goepfert PA, Moldoveanu Z, Schwartz D, Spearman PW, El Habib R, Spring MD, Zhu Y, Smith C, Flores J, and Weinhold KJ; National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases AIDS Vaccine Evaluation Group (2004). Comparison of systemic and mucosal delivery of 2 canarypox virus vaccines expressing either HIV-1 genes or the gene for rabies virus G protein. J Infect Dis. 189(7), 1221-31. Weitkamp JH, Kallewaard NL, Bowen AL , Lafleur BJ, Greenberg HB, and Crowe JE Jr (2005). VH1-46 is the dominant immunoglobulin heavy chain gene segment in rotavirus-specific memory B cells expressing the intestinal homing receptor alpha4beta7. J Immunol. 174(6), 3454-60.

GRANT FUNDING RECEIVED FOR FELLOW RESEARCH PROJECTS: Mark Hicar, MD, PhD, 2006-09 Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society-St. Jude Children's ResearchHospital Fellowship Program in Basic Research; Jens Krause, MD, 2008-2010 PediatricInfectious Diseases Society MedImmune Fellowship Award; Asad Ali, MD, 2006-2008 - Recipient of the AIDS International Training and Research Program (AITRP) Fellowship of Fogarty International Center, 2008-2009 Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society MedImmune Fellowship Grant for Research in Respiratory Viruses, 2008-2013 PI of R01 TW008126 Global Health Research Initiative Program (GRIP) grant, sponsored by Fogarty International Center, NIH.