Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC

4401 Penn Avenue, AOB Suite 2300
Pittsburgh
PA
15224
USA
Phone: (412) 692-7438
Fax: (412) 692-7016

TRAINING PROGRAM DIRECTOR
Philana Ling Lin, MD, MSc

CHIEF OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES
John V. Williams, MD

ASSOCIATES/DIVISION MEMBERS:

  • Brian Campfield, MD
  • Carolyn Coyne, PhD
  • Terence Dermody, MD
  • Will DePas, PhD
  • Michael Green, MD, MPH
  • Timothy Hand, PhD
  • Melissa, Kane, PhD
  • Philana Ling Lin, MD, MSc
  • Anita McElroy, MD, PhD
  • Marian G. Michaels, MD, MPH
  • Andrew Nowalk, MD, PhD
  • Laurie Silva, PhD
  • John V. Williams, MD

RESEARCH INTEREST

Brian Campfield, MD

Host-pathogen interactions in the lung; role of follistatin-like protein 1 in lung inflammation.

Carolyn Coyne, PhD
Pathogenesis of RNA viruses (e.g, enteroviruses, flaviviruses); viral penetration into GI and placental barriers

Terry Dermody, MD
Mechanisms of viral pathogenesis (viral attachment, cell entry, genome replication, cellular signaling)

Will DePas, PhD
Pathogenesis of non-tuberculous mycobacteria

Michael Green, MD, MPH

Infections in children undergoing solid organ transplantation and stem cell transplantation; EBV and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders; antimicrobial stewardship

Timothy Hand, PhD
Interactions between gut microbiome and immune response

Melissa, Kane, PhD
Immunity to retroviral infections

Philana Ling Lin, MD, MSc

Mechanisms of protection in tuberculosis; HIV-TB co-infection, host pathogen interaction in HIV-TB co-infection; invasive pneumococcal infections after the conjugate vaccine

Anita McElroy, MD, PhD

Mouse adaptive responses to Rift Valley Fever Virus (RVFV) vaccination; immune correlates of protection for RVFV

Marian G. Michaels, MD, MPH

Congenital cytomegalovirus infection; lung and heart-lung transplant infectious disease; monitoring and reporting of infectious complications in immunosuppression trials in recipients of organ transplantation

Andrew Nowalk, MD, PhD

Lyme disease; infections in short gut syndrome and intestinal failure

Laurie Silva, PhD
Replication and pathogenesis of Chikungunya virus

John V. Williams, MD

Immunity and pathogenesis of HMPV and other respiratory viruses; molecular epidemiology of respiratory and enteric infections in children


RECENT FELLOWS’ PUBLISHED FIRST-AUTHOR PAPERS OR ABSTRACTS:

Lopez SMC*, Martin JM*, Johnson M, Kurs-Lasky M, Horne WT, Marshall CW, Cooper VS, Williams JV#, Shaikh N#. A method of processing nasopharyngeal swabs to enable multiple testing. Pediatr Res. 2019 Jul 9. doi: 10.1038/s41390-019-0498-1. *, # = equal contribution.

Lopez SMC, Campfield BT, Nowalk AJ. Oral Management for Pediatric Lyme Meningitis. J Pediatric Infect Dis Soc. 2018 Aug; 8(3):272-275.doi: 10.1093/jpids/piy072.

Yamada M, Macedo C, Louis K, Shi T, Landsittel D, Nguyen C, Michaels M, Feingold B, Mazariegos G, Green M and Metes D. Detection of Different Gene Expression Profiles in CD8+ T Cells from Chronic High EBV Load Carriers after Pediatric Heart and Liver Transplantation. Amercian Transplant Congress, 2018, Seattle, WA

Yamada M, Nguyen C, Fadakar P, Ganoza A, Humar A, Shapiro R, Michaels MG, Green M. Epidemiology and outcome of chronic high Epstein-Barr viral load carriage in pediatric kidney transplant recipients. Pediatr Transplant. 2018 Feb 6. doi: 10.1111/petr.13147.

Yamada M, Nowalk AJ. Two sides of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) coin: Long-term control of EBV after liver transplantation? Pediatr Transplant. 2017 Aug;21(5). doi: 10.1111/petr.12943. Epub 2017 May 22.

Viswanathan A, Maxwell-Davis T, Soltys K, Shen C, Landsittel D, Mazariegos G, Michaels MG. Green M, Epidemiology of EBV Disease after Pediatric Liver Transplantation in a Single Center Experience. 9th Congress of the International Pediatric Transplant Association 2017

Lee B, Robinson KM, McHugh KJ, Scheller EV, Mandalapu S, Chen C, Di YP, Clay ME, Enelow RI, Dubin PJ, and JF Alcorn. Influenza-induced Type I Interferon Enhances Susceptibility to Gram-negative and Gram-positive Bacterial Pneumonia in Mice. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 2015; 309(2):L158-67.

Lee B, Gopal R, Manni ML, McHugh KJ, Mandalapu S, Robinson KM, and JF Alcorn. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 is Required for Suppression of Type 17 Immunity During Influenza, Bacterial Super-infection. ImmunoHorizons 2017; 1 (6): 81-91.

Huppler AR, Whibley N, Woolford C, Childs EC, Je J, Biswas PS, Mitchell AP, McGeachy MJ, Gaffen SL. A Candida albicans strain expressing IL-17A limits pathology during disseminated infection. Infect Immun 2015; 83:3684-92.

Huppler AR, Verma AH, Conti HR, Gaffen SL. Neutrophils do not express IL-17A in the context of acute oropharyngeal candidiasis. Pathogens 2015 4:559-72.

Huppler AR, Bishu S, Gaffen SL. Mucocutaneous candidiasis: the IL-17 pathway and implications for targeted immunotherapy. Arthritis Res Ther. 2012 Jul 23;14(4):217. doi: 10.1186/ar3893.


GRANT FUNDING RECEIVED FOR FELLOW RESEARCH PROJECTS:

Anna Huppler, MD: PIDS the Stanley A. Plotkin Sanofi Pasteur Fellowship Award, 2012-2014.

Benjamin Lee, MD: NIH T32 Grant, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, 2013-2015.

Masaki Yamada, MD: Starzl Transplant Fellowship Award in Transplant Biology, Thomas E. Starzl Transplantation Institute, University of Pittsburgh, 2017-2018

Santiago Lopez, MD: Clinical and Translational Science Fellowship (TL1), Career Education and Enhancement for Health Care Diversity, University of Pittsburgh, 2016-2018

Timothy Onarecker, MD: NIH T32 Grant, UPMC’s Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh, 2017-2018

Megan Culler Freeman, MD, PhD: PIDS/St. Jude’s Children’s Research Hospital Fellowship Program in Basic and Translational Research, 2019-2021

Glenn Rapsinski, MD, PhD: Pediatric Scientist Development Program, 2020-2022


MAJOR FEATURES OF TRAINING PROGRAM:

This program is designed to prepare pediatricians for an academic career in pediatric infectious diseases. The clinical training features an exceptional variety of infectious disease problems since Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh (CHP) is a US News and World Report top 10-ranked institution. CHP is the only children's hospital in Western Pennsylvania with a catchment area of >2.5 million. CHP is a center for bone marrow and solid organ transplantation, cardiac surgery, cystic fibrosis, epilepsy, and the care of patients with short-gut syndrome. Thus, PID trainees become skilled in the management of serious infections in previously healthy patients as well as unusual infections in pediatric patients with complex medical problems. There are abundant and diverse opportunities for clinical and laboratory research. The close affiliation with the University of Pittsburgh's Graduate School of Public Health permits advanced course work in statistics and epidemiology, and mentorship by experts in these areas. In addition, close affiliation with the University of Pittsburgh Departments of Immunology and Microbiology & Molecular Genetics provides opportunity for research mentorship from experts in these departments with interests in infectious diseases. Many PID fellows have worked with mentors from other Pitt divisions and departments.

Overview

The PID Fellowship is an ACGME-approved training program designed to produce superior academic PID specialists. The standard fellowship is three years in duration, with the majority of the first year devoted to clinical training and a progressive increase in protected time for research activities over the next two years. The University of Pittsburgh offers a wide variety of research and career specific options: For fellows who envision a career in education, a Master's or Certificate in Medical Education is available. Degrees in Clinical Research (from certificate to PhD) can be sought in the Institute for Clinical Research Education at the University. A host of opportunities are available for learning bench research from world-renowned researchers at the University of Pittsburgh (many of whom are on the CHP campus). In addition to a wide variety of clinical and bench research opportunities, the fellows will also actively participate in Infection Prevention and Antimicrobial Stewardship Programs within the Children's Hospital. Limited funds are available for extension of the research activities of fellows to a fourth year of training in order to better prepare the fellow for the assumption of an academic career. U.S. citizenship is not required for application to the fellowship.

Clinical Training

Centered at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC and with close ties to the Adult Infectious Diseases Program at UPMC, the fellowship offers fellows a wide breadth of clinical experience. Because Children's Hospital is the major tertiary pediatric facility in a region that includes western Pennsylvania, southeast Ohio, western Maryland, and West Virginia, the clinical problems seen include entities ranging from the common, such as pneumonia and osteomyelitis; to the unusual, such as zoonotic infections; to the complex, such as rare and mixed infectious diseases in immunosuppressed transplant patients. With an active microbiology and virology laboratory, and in- and outpatient facilities designed for the care of children, the clinical experience of the trainee is quite complete. Moreover, the Pediatric Infectious Disease division maintains an exceptionally strong partnership with the solid organ and stem cell transplant, oncology, and primary immunodeficiency services. Thus, the CHP fellowship program provides outstanding training in the care of immunocompromised patients, especially transplant infectious diseases.


AFFILIATED HOSPITALS: None.

NUMBER OF PEDIATRIC BEDS: 315

FELLOWS ACCEPTED EACH YEAR: 1-2

TRAINING FOR MD; DO; MD, PhD: Yes

FUNDING IS ENSURED FOR ALL 3 YEARS: Yes

VISAS ACCEPTED: J1, H1B, Other

IS COMPLETION OF PEDIATRIC RESIDENCY TRAINING IN THE U.S. OR CANADA A REQUIREMENT? YES

THE PROGRAM OFFERS THE FOLLOWING TRAINING:

Program provides training in diagnostic microbiology using laboratories on site:

Microbiology laboratory: YES
Clinical virus isolation laboratory: YES
Molecular diagnostics: YES

Program provides training in infection control and hospital epidemiology as:

Didactic lectures: YES
Hands on experience: YES
Infection Control Meetings/Membership: YES

Opportunity to fulfill the ABP requirements for scholarly activity is available in the following general areas:

Bacteriology/bacterial infections: YES
Epidemiology and statistics: YES
Infection control/hospital epidemiology: YES
Immunizations/Public health: NO
Mycology/fungal infections: YES
Parasitology/parasitic diseases: NO
Virology/viral diseases: YES
Antimicrobial agents: YES

Research opportunities in the section’s program could be describes as:

Basic (bench): YES
Molecular: YES
Community: YES
Epidemiologic: YES
Clinical: YES
International/Public Health: YES
Health Services: NO
HIV, Basic: NO
ACTG Site: NO

Documented liaison exists offering opportunities for research experience n the laboratory of investigator(s) who is (are) not faculty of the section: YES

Program offers the opportunity to obtain a Master’s degree in a field such as Public Health, Education, Clinical Sciences, or Epidemiology (assuming appropriate arrangements are made): YES

Graduate school courses are available to trainee (assuming appropriate arrangements are made): YES

Program provides substantial clinical experiences for trainees in special areas/hosts:

HIV: YES
Bone marrow transplantation: YES
Solid organ/transplantation: YES
Travelers/adoptees: NO
Adults: YES
Congenital immune deficiencies: YES

Program includes ABP-required core curricula in scholarly activities in didactic lecture course for fellows (includes epidemiology, statistics, research design, and academic careers): YES

Program has an NIH-sponsored training grant: YES

The Infectious Diseases Service is the primary care provider for HIV-infected children and adolescents: YES

Average number of new outpatient consultations per month: 40

Average number of established outpatient follow-up visits per month: 35

Average number of new inpatient consultations per month: 75

Number of trainees completing program in the last 5 years: 5