The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

3615 Civic Center Blvd. Rm. 1202
Philadelphia
PA
19104
USA
Phone: (215) 590-2017
Fax: (215) 590-2025

TRAINING PROGRAM DIRECTOR:

Brian Fisher, DO, MSCE, MPH
Dr. Fisher's research focuses on infections in children with immunocompromising conditions. He is particularly interested in infections in children with cancer and serves as the Chair of the Infectious Disease Domain within the Children's Oncology Group.

CHIEF OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES:

Theoklis Zaoutis, M.D. MSCE
Dr. Zaoutis also serves as Director of the Center for Pediatric Clinical Effectiveness Research at the CHOP Research Institute. The mission of the CPCE is to discover, disseminate, and implement knowledge about best practices in pediatrics. Dr. Zaoutis is a Senior Scholar in the Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics (CCEB) at PENN and directs the Master of Science of Clinical Epidemiology Training Program at the CCEB.

ASSOCIATE/DIVISION MEMBERS:

  • Hamid Bassiri, M.D., Ph.D
    Research Interest: Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cell development and function; Cellular immunotherapy for cancer; Primary immunodeficiencies; Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH).
     
  • Louis Bell, MD
    Research Interest: The use of primary-care practice based research networks for clinical research and quality improvement through the use of clinical pathways.
     
  • Jeffrey Bergelson, MD
    Research Interest: Viral pathogenesis, virus receptors, cell biology of virus entry.
     
  • Susan Coffin, MD, MPH
    Research Interest: Healthcare associated infections, vaccine preventable viral diseases, pandemic influenza
     
  • Kevin Downes, MD
    Research Interest: Antimicrobial-associated adverse drug events, in particular acute kidney injury; Antimicrobial clinical pharmacology; Therapeutic management of pediatric infectious diseases.
     
  • Kristen Feemster, MD, MPH, MSHP
    Research Interest: Epidemiology of vaccine preventable diseases with a focus on community and social factors, global and domestic vaccine policy, vaccine hesitancy, ambulatory healthcare associated respiratory infection, surveillance
     
  • Jeffrey S. Gerber, MD, PhD
    Dr. Gerber's research focuses on observational studies to determine the epidemiology and outcomes associated with antimicrobial use in children as well as interventions designed to improve antimicrobial use based on established guidelines.
     
  • Jason Kim, MD, MSCE
    Research Interest: Infections in immunocompromised children, Clostridium difficile infection epidemiology, Recurrent fever syndromes, Outpatient infectious diseases
     
  • Paul A. Offit, MD
    Dr. Offit has published more than 150 papers in medical and scientific journals in the areas of rotavirus-specific immune responses and vaccine safety. He is also the author of six medical narratives which have received numerous accolades. He is the co-inventor of the rotavirus vaccine, RotaTeq, recommended for universal use in infants by the CDC.
     
  • Julia Sammons, MD, MSCE
    Research Interest: Prevention of healthcare-associated infections; epidemiology of pediatric C. difficile infection; change management and implementation of quality improvement initiatives
     
  • Joseph W. St. Geme, III, MD
    Research Interest: Bacterial pathogenesis, bacterial colonization, Haemophilus influenzae virulence factors, Kingella kingae virulence factors, meningitis, respiratory tract infections, osteoarticular infections
     
  • Andrew Steenhoff, MBBCh, DCH
    Research Interest: Global Health, HIV, Tuberculosis

TITLE(S) OF RECENT FELLOWS’ PUBLISHED PAPERS OR RESEARCH PROJECTS: 

Milder EA, Rizzi MD, Morales KH, Ross RK, Lautenbach E, Gerber JS. Impact of a new practice guideline on antibiotic use with pediatric tonsillectomy. JAMA Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2015 May 1;141(5):410-6.

Larru B, Gerber JS. Cutaneous bacterial infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes in infants and children. Pediatr Clin North Am. 2014 Apr;61(2):457-78

Bassiri H, Das R, Guan P, Barrett DM, Brennan PJ, Banerjee PP, Wiener SJ, Orange JS, Brenner MB, Grupp SA, Nichols KE. iNKT cell cytotoxic responses control T-lymphoma growth in vitro and in vivo. Cancer Immunol Res. 2014 Jan;2(1):59-69.

Gerber JS, Prasad PA, Fiks AG, Localio AR, Bell LM, Keren R, Zaoutis TE. Durability of benefits of an outpatient antimicrobial stewardship intervention after discontinuation of audit and feedback. JAMA. 2014 Dec 17;312(23):2569-70

Das R, Bassiri H, Guan P, Wiener S, Banerjee PP, Zhong MC, Veillette A, Orange JS, Nichols KE. The adaptor molecule SAP plays essential roles during invariant NKT cell cytotoxicity and lytic synapse formation. Blood. 2013 Apr 25;121(17):3386-95

Sammons JS, Localio R, Xiao R, Coffin SE, Zaoutis T. Clostridium difficile infection is associated with increased risk of death and prolonged hospitalization in children. Clin Infect Dis. 2013 Jul;57(1):1-8.

Feemster KA1, Li Y, Localio AR, Shults J, Edelstein P, Lautenbach E, Smith T, Metlay JP. Risk of invasive pneumococcal disease varies by neighbourhood characteristics: implications for prevention policies. Epidemiol Infect. 2013 Aug;141(8):1679-89.

Pierce VM, Elkan M, Leet M, McGowan KL, Hodinka RL. Comparison of the Idaho Technology FilmArray system to real-time PCR for detection of respiratory pathogens in children. J Clin Microbiol. 2012 Feb;50(2):364-71.

Kronman MP, Zaoutis TE, Haynes K, Feng R, Coffin SE. Antibiotic exposure and IBD development among children: a population-based cohort study. Pediatrics. 2012 Oct;130(4):e794-803.

Pierce VM, Neide B, Hodinka RL. Evaluation of the Gen-Probe Aptima HIV-1 RNA qualitative assay as an alternative to Western blot analysis for confirmation of HIV infection. J Clin Microbiol. 2011 Apr;49(4):1642-5.

Kestenbaum LA, Ebberson J, Zorc JJ, Hodinka RL, Shah SS. Defining cerebrospinal fluid white blood cell count reference values in neonates and young infants. Pediatrics. 2010 Feb;125(2):257-64

Paschke AA, Zaoutis T, Conway PH, Xie D, Keren R. Previous antimicrobial exposure is associated with drug-resistant urinary tract infections in children. Pediatrics. 2010 Apr;125(4):664-72.

GRANT FUNDING RECEIVED FOR FELLOW RESEARCH PROJECTS: 

Fellows have the opportunity to apply for and receive grant funding from a variety of resources. In the past five years fellows have been awarded positions on NIH T32 training grants for pharmacoepidemiology, infectious disease epidemiology, and pediatric hospital epidemiology. Additionally, recent fellows have successfully earned the Pediatric Infectious Disease fellowship Award (two fellows), the Pediatric Scientist Development Program, and the CHOP Translational Research/Entrepreneurial Master's Training Program Grant to support their research endeavors in the second and third years of fellowship.

MAJOR FEATURES OF TRAINING PROGRAM:
The Pediatric Infectious Diseases Training Program is a three-year fellowship program designed to prepare pediatricians for a career in academic pediatric infectious diseases. The first year is dedicated to clinical training. The second and third years are focused on research training in clinical epidemiology, basic science or translational research. The goal of this fellowship program is to prepare graduates to be effective clinicians and independent physician scientists.

During the first year of fellowship, the trainee will spend the majority of his or her time in clinical arenas. The goal of the clinical experience is to provide the trainee with exposure to common and uncommon infectious diseases, in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised hosts. With the oversight of experienced attending physicians, fellows care for patients on the general infectious disease consultation service or the immunocompromised infectious disease consultation service. Additionally, fellows will see patients in our busy outpatient clinic. Specific details about clinical training are included in the clinical services section.

The second and third years of fellowship training are designed to provide the trainee with ample time to conduct research in a protected environment by minimizing concurrent clinical responsibilities. Trainees with an interest in bench science are encouraged to explore suitable mentors at any location on the University of Pennsylvania campus. Trainees with an interest in clinical research will often pursue the Clinical Epidemiology or Health Policy Master of Science Programs at the Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania. Finally, trainees with an interest in translation research are encouraged to consider pursuit of a master's degree at the Institute for Translational Medicine and Therapeutics at the Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania. Matriculation in any of the masters programs is contingent on funding opportunities.

  • AFFILIATED HOSPITALS: None
  • NUMBER OF PEDIATRIC BEDS: 535
  • FELLOWS ACCEPTED EACH YEAR: 3
  • TRAINING FOR: MD, DO, MD/PhD
  • FUNDING IS ENSURED FOR ALL 3 YEARS: YES
  • VISAS ACCEPTED: J1, H1B, Other
  • IS COMPLETION OF PEDIATRIC RESIDENCY TRAINING IN THE U.S. OR CANADA A REQUIREMENT? YES

THE PROGRAM OFFERS THE FOLLOWING TRAINING:

  • Program provides training in diagnostic microbiology using laboratories on site:
    • Microbiology laboratory: YES
    • Clinical virus isolation laboratory: YES
    • Molecular diagnostics: YES
       
  • Program provides training in infection control and hospital epidemiology as:
    • Didactic lectures: YES
    • Hands on experience: YES
    • Infection Control Meetings/Membership: YES
  • Opportunity to fulfill the ABP requirements for scholarly activity is available in the following general areas:
     
    • Bacteriology/bacterial infections: YES
    • Epidemiology and statistics: YES
    • Infection control/hospital epidemiology: YES
    • Immunizations/Public health: YES
    • Mycology/fungal infections: YES
    • Parasitology/parasitic diseases: YES
    • Virology/viral diseases: YES
    • Antimicrobial agents: YES
  • Research opportunities in the section's program could be described as:
    • Basic (bench): YES
    • Molecular: YES
    • Community: YES
    • Epidemiologic: YES
    • Clinical: YES
    • International/Public Health: YES
    • Health Services: YES
    • HIV, Basic: YES
       
  • Documented liaison exists offering opportunities for research experience in the laboratory of investigators(s) who is (are) not faculty of the section: YES
     
  • Program offers the opportunity to obtain a Master's degree in a field such as Public Health, Education, Clinical Sciences, or Epidemiology (assuming appropriate are made): YES
     
  • Graduate school courses are available to trainee (assuming appropriate arrangements are made): YES
     
  • Program provides substantial clinical experience for trainees in:
    • HIV: YES
    • Bone marrow transplantation: YES
    • Solid organ/transplantation: YES
    • Travelers/adoptees: YES
    • Adults: NO
    • Congenital immune deficiencies: YES
       
  • Program includes ABP-required core curricula in scholarly activities in didactic lecture course for fellows (includes epidemiology, statistics, research design, and academic careers): YES
     
  • Program has an NIH-sponsored training grant:
     
  • The Infectious Diseases Service is the primary care provider for HIV infected children and adolescents:  NO

Average number of new outpatient consultations per month: 45

Average number of established outpatient follow-up visits per month: 30

Average number of new inpatient consultations per month:
General: 110
Immunocompromised: 70

Number of trainees completing program in the last 5 years: 12