The National Action Plan for Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

Outcomes by 2020 in this area include:

  • Establishment of antibiotic stewardship programs in all acute care hospitals and improved antibiotic stewardship across all healthcare settings.
  • Reduction of inappropriate antibiotic use by 50% in outpatient settings and by 20% in inpatient settings.
  • Establishment of State Antibiotic Resistance (AR) Prevention (Protect) Programs in all 50 states to monitor regionally important multi-drug resistant organisms and provide feedback and technical assistance to healthcare facilities.
  • Elimination of the use of medically-important antibiotics for growth promotion in food-producing animals.
    • FDA removed the use of antibiotics for growth promotion that started January of 2017 through FDA guidance 209.

Outcomes by 2020 in this area include:

  • Creation of a regional public health network—the Detect Network of AR Regional Laboratories—for resistance testing, a specimen repository for resistant bacterial strains, and a National Sequence Database of Resistant Pathogens.
  • Routine reporting of antibiotic use and resistance data to National Health Safety Network (NHSN) by 95% of Medicare-eligible hospitals, as well as by Department of Defense and Veterans Affairs healthcare facilities.
  • Routine testing of zoonotic and animal pathogens for antibiotic susceptibility at ten to twenty National Animal Health Laboratory Network (NAHLN) and Veterinary Laboratory Investigation and Response Network (Vet-LIRN) member laboratories, using standardized testing methods and data sharing practices.

Outcomes by 2020 in this area include:

  • Development and dissemination of authorized point-of-need diagnostic tests that rapidly distinguish between bacterial and viral infections.
  • Validation of diagnostic tests that rapidly determine the antibiotic resistance profiles of bacteria of public health concern.

Outcomes by 2020 in this area include:

  • Characterization of the gut microbiome—the communities of microorganisms that live within the gastrointestinal tract—of at least one animal species raised for food.  This outcome will help us understand how antibiotic treatments disrupt normal gut bacteria and how animal growth might be promoted—and bacterial diseases might be treated—without using antibiotics.
  • Advancement of at least two new antibiotic drug candidates, non-traditional therapeutics, and/or vaccines from pre-clinical testing to clinical trials for treatment or prevention of human disease.
  • Development of at least three new drug candidates or probiotic treatments as alternatives to antibiotics for promoting growth or preventing disease in animals.
  • Creation of a biopharmaceutical incubator—a consortium of academic, biotechnology and pharmaceutical industry partners—to promote innovation and increase the number of antibiotics and antibodies in the drug-development pipeline.

Outcomes by 2020 in this area include:

  • Elevation of antibiotic resistance as an international priority for global health and security.
  • Enhanced capacity to identify Antibiotic resistant pathogens in more than 15 partner countries.
  • Establishment of a common U.S.-European Union (EU) system for sharing and analyzing bacterial resistance patterns for priority pathogens.
  • Development of a global database to collect harmonized quantitative data on the use of antibacterial agents in animals.
  • Development of national plans to combat antibiotic resistance and improve antibiotic stewardship in low- and middle-income countries.
  • Strengthened regulatory and supply chain systems that assure the quality, safety, and efficacy of antibiotics used in low- and middle-income countries.